Unmanned Aircraft Systems

 To ensure the safety of all, the Federal Aviation Administration and the U.S. Congress have established specific rules for small UAS operators.  The FAA has established different Rules depending on the type of operator you are:

Recreational/Hobbyist Rules.

Effective May 17, 2019 the FAA created rules for recreational operators under 14 CFR Part 107. The eight statutory conditions are summarized below, read the full notice and details under 14 CFR Part 107.

  • The aircraft is flown strictly for recreational purposes
  • The aircraft is operated in accordance with or within the programming of a community-based organization's set of safety guidelines that are developed in coordination with the FAA
    • Fly only for recreational purposes
    • Keep your unmanned aircraft within your visual line-of-sight or within the visual line of sight of a visual observer who is co-located and in direct communication with you
    • Do not fly above 400 feet in uncontrolled (Class G) airspace
    • Do not fly in controlled airspace without an FAA authorization
    • Follow all FAA airspace restrictions, including special security instructions and temporary flight restrictions
    • Never fly near other aircraft
    • Always give way to all other aircraft
    • Never fly over groups of people, public events, or stadiums full of people
    • Never fly near emergency response activities
    • Never fly under the influence of drugs or alcohol
You also should be able to explain to an FAA inspector or law enforcement official which safety guidelines you are following if you are flying under the exception for limited recreational unmanned aircraft operations.
  • The aircraft is flown within the visual line of sight of the person operating the aircraft or a visual observer co-located and in direct communication with the operator.
  • The aircraft is operated in a manner that does not interfere with and gives way to any manned aircraft.
  • In Class B, Class C, or Class D airspace or within the lateral boundaries of the surface area of Class E airspace designated for an airport, the operator obtains prior authorization from the Administrator or designee before operating and complies with all airspace restrictions and prohibitions.
  • In Class G airspace, the aircraft is flown from the surface to not more than 400 feet above ground level and complies with all airspace restrictions and prohibitions.
  • The operator has passed an aeronautical knowledge and safety test and maintains proof of test passage to be made available to the Administrator or a designee of the Administrator or law enforcement upon request.
  • The aircraft is registered and marked and proof of registration is made available to the Administrator or a designee of the Administrator or law enforcement upon request.

It is up to you as a drone pilot to know the Rules of the Sky, and where it is and is not safe to fly.

See the full details for Recreational operators on the FAA's site.

Commercial (Part 107) Rules

The following is a summary of the FAA's Part 107 rules:

  • Unmanned aircraft must weigh less than 55 lbs. (25 kg).
  • Visual line-of-sight (VLOS) only; the unmanned aircraft must remain within VLOS of the remote pilot in command and the person manipulating the flight controls of the small UAS. Alternatively, the unmanned aircraft must remain within VLOS of the visual observer.
  • At all times the small unmanned aircraft must remain close enough to the remote pilot in command and the person manipulating the flight controls of the small UAS for those people to be capable of seeing the aircraft with vision unaided by any device other than corrective lenses.
  • Small unmanned aircraft may not operate over any persons not directly participating in the operation, not under a covered structure, and not inside a covered stationary vehicle.
  • Daylight-only operations, or civil twilight (30 minutes before official sunrise to 30 minutes after official sunset, local time) with appropriate anti-collision lighting.
  • Must yield right of way to other aircraft.
  • May use visual observer (VO) but not required.
  • First-person view camera cannot satisfy “see-and-avoid” requirement but can be used as long as requirement is satisfied in other ways.
  • Maximum groundspeed of 100 mph (87 knots).
  • Maximum altitude of 400 feet above ground level (AGL) or, if higher than 400 feet AGL, remain within 400 feet of a structure.
  • Minimum weather visibility of 3 miles from control station.
  • Operations in Class B, C, D and E airspace are allowed with the required ATC permission.
  • Operations in Class G airspace are allowed without ATC permission.
  • No person may act as a remote pilot in command or VO for more than one unmanned aircraft operation at one time.
  • No operations from a moving aircraft.
  • No operations from a moving vehicle unless the operation is over a sparsely populated area.
  • No careless or reckless operations.
  • No carriage of hazardous materials.

It is up to you as a drone pilot to know the Rules of the Sky, and where it is and is not safe to fly.

See the full details for Part 107 operators on the FAA's site.

A list of all the FAA certified apps for LAANC may be found here.

Public Safety/Government

All information for public safety or government users may be found on the FAA's site.

Education

All information for educational users may be found on the FAA's site.

*The FAA has developed a User Identification Tool if you are unsure of the type of pilot you are*


All operations within a 5 mile radius of our Airport may be verified on the Know Before You Fly Map.

Recreational UAS Operators within 5 miles of the Airport are REQUIRED to notify the Airport of their operations, you may do so by filling out of the form below.

Part 107 UAS pilots must have prior authorization within 5 miles of the Airport; which may be achieved through:

  • LAANC (Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability) OR
  • Contacting the airspace controller (currently Denver TRACON and their contact information is 303-342-1500 option 1) OR
  • Receiving a 107.41 Authorization
    • this YouTube video explains how and when to apply for Wide Area Authorizations

If you wish to notify the Airport of your commercial operation you may also use the form below.


INCOMPLETE forms or fields with N/A will will not be accepted as valid notification


Further Reading 

Think Before You Launch: Safety Guide for Recreational Unmanned Aircraft Users

Know Before You Fly: Unmanned Flight Safety Guide

FAA: DroneZone

PLEASE NOTE: Once the Remote Tower is active these requirements/notifications will change.  Please follow us on FB, Twitter, Instagram, or LinkedIn or check our web page: www.flynoco.com/about/remote-tower for the latest information on the project.